Posts Tagged ‘home purchase advice’

Lenders are Messing Up Real Estate Sales!

Monday, September 19th, 2016

I don’t know if it’s just bad luck, but I have been having MAJOR issues with lenders lately – messing up (and almost killing) escrows at the 11th hour. (I should say that these mistakes are not from MY preferred lenders, but from lenders whose clients are purchasing my listings). Here is what I know: lenders are held to high standards, most importantly they must check all paperwork and needed documentation during the buyer’s loan contingency process. Here are some of the dumb things that I have seen lately from buyers’ lenders: th

1. Not checking buyer documentation. I had a lender this past week that on the day of the loan contingency removal deadline realized that there were two parties to a trust for which they based funds going into the loan. Now I have to assume that they had a copy of this trust for 21 days, and that they vetted it to make sure their borrower qualified. However, on day 21 I find out that they “just realized” that there were 2 trustees, not one, and therefore the borrower actually had half of the money to his name instead of the whole trust amount, on which they based approval.

This is unacceptable folks! These are basic inquiries a lender needs to make when processing a loan! How could the lender not have known the borrower’s stake in the trust when it should have had that trust documentation, which clearly identifies trustees and is a vital document when funds are coming from it?! Unbelievable.

2. Sending over loan docs with a change in borrower names. Believe it or not, a lender this past week sent over loan docs to escrow to be signed by the buyers, with closing slated for the following day (which happened to be a Friday so there was no room for screw-ups). The problem was that the docs had DIFFERENT buyer names than the contract/escrow documents – they basically eliminated a buyer! Now, I don’t know about you but it isn’t rocket science -  it is pretty basic common sense that if you have a contract between parties, you cannot just change or eliminate the name(s) of a party without proper documentation (it also happens to be the law). Lenders KNOW this!

Suffice it to say that in this particular case escrow and I had to jump through hoops and the lender had to re-draw docs at the 11th hour. It was very stressful. This is absolutely unbelievable. The lender has copies of the contracts and all documentation relating to the purchase agreement. For them to do something like this is just crazy.

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The moral of my crazy lender scenario week is that there are often problems in a real estate transaction, so prepare for them. But those who are charged with qualifying borrowers need to be much more careful. Things like this should not be happening. This past week was officially named by me “lender screw-up week.” I sure am glad those lenders that I work with are so on top of things, and hope to never work with either of these particular lenders again.

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5 Steps to Determine the Validity of that List Price

Thursday, March 19th, 2015

There are many buyers out there who do not know how to read and understand recent comparable sold properties (there are also many agents in the same boat, so if you are a buyer do not feel bad). Of course, if you are working with a real estate agent who is familiar with the neighborhood(s) where you are focusing your home buying search, then that agent will be able to help you understand how to sort through the comps and come to a valid price so that you can write an offer. house_question

The problem is that oftentimes agents may not be intimately familiar with a neighborhood (i.e. they do not themselves know why some homes have lower sales prices than others), so it is up to the agent to really do some research. Here are the steps to follow so that you know whether that asking price is in fact valid:

1.  Print out all recent sales in the last 6 months in the area. If there are none then your agent will need to go outside the neighborhood to find similar homes – those that have amenities and other features that are comparable to the home you are thinking of purchasing. If there are still none then s/he will need to find some that may have more or less to offer, and then weigh the factors to come to a reasonable price.

2.  Speak with the listing agent. Every agent should place a call or visit to the listing agent whenever there is a question about value. The listing agent is the one who listed the home at that price, so the best place to start is with that person. Your agent needs to ask what comps were used to decide on a list price (in cases where it is not obvious – if you are looking in a tract neighborhood and there are 5 homes that have all sold in the same range then it is usually clear). If the listing is in a neighborhood where homes have sold across a wide value range, then you need to understand why.

justice-scales3.  Call the listing agents who sold the comparable homes. You can often get even more information this way that you may never have been able to see in photos or a virtual tour. For example, I just listed a home in a neighborhood where there is a discrepancy amongst recent comparable prices. I happen to know the neighborhood well (I live there), but a potential buyer’s agent called to ask me about the comps (I had sold a few of them) and I happen to know a lot about them and why they sold at the prices they did. I drafted an analysis on all the sold properties, and this was a big help to the agent and his clients. When I am representing a buyer in that same situation I ask for the same thing – at least a verbal analysis if someone is not willing to draft one (I of course take notes and then draft it up for my clients).

4.  Understand that “price per square foot” is not the sole focus. If you look only at price per square foot and there are comps all over the place, you may be under-or over-valuating the home you are considering. There are many factors that need to be taken into consideration – location, upgrades, condition (even upgraded homes can be poorly maintained, and vice versa), amenities, views, lot size, and negative factors (noise, high traffic areas, hazard zones, etc.) Even two identical homes in the same community can have vastly different prices depending on the factors mentioned. You really need to get more information to understand the discrepancies before progressing. Always remember that every home has it’s own resume and story to tell, so just because another model match sold for a particular price does not mean that the same price applies to the home you are considering.

5.  Make a chart or comparison table to understand the comparable properties. You can include features that are positive and negative, and you can then compare them to the subject property (the one you are thinking about purchasing). Seeing it on paper can really help many buyers to understand differences and feel better about making an offer that will appraise (if you are getting a loan), and that makes sense in light of the other homes that have sold nearby.

In the end it is common knowledge that those who have more information are better informed to make big decisions. Since buying a home is one of those big decisions it is imperative to do your homework. Find a smart, experienced agent in the area(s) you like and use them to help you get to the point where you feel comfortable with the values in an area by heeding the above advice. That is their job. Happy house hunting!

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Buyers: Now is the Time to Plan Your Spring Buying Strategy

Saturday, March 7th, 2015

All the predictions about the Spring real estate market indicate that it is going to be a busy one. Focusing on my own North San Diego market, I agree and I am getting excited about several upcoming listings of my own. There is a buzz in the air amongst my local colleagues, and many have indicated they have listings coming up as well. With interest rates still low and inventory about to get a boost, it is a good time for buyers to make a plan for finding and purchasing the right home.checklist

Here is how a buyer can be ready to jump once s/he finds the right house this Spring:

1.  Get preapproved. Make sure that you have preapproval from a lender so that you know your budget and can be ready to make an offer when you find the right home. This will save you a lot of time and could prevent you from losing a home you really like to another buyer who was ready to go.

2.  Find a real estate agent in the area(s) you like. Having a skilled local agent on your side is the best assurance that you will be able to view new listings quickly. Another advantage is that many agents hear of “pocket” or upcoming listings before they hit the MLS, providing you with an opportunity many buyers may not have.

3.  Be ready to schedule a showing on listings that meet your criteria when they list. Get into those new listings as soon as you can. If you like the home you can strategize with your agent on how to make the most appealing offer to the seller; in doing so you may be able to avoid multiple offer situations.

4.  Understand the market(s) you are searching. Study recent closed sale prices and understand values in different neighborhoods. This will help you in your search. Your agent can assist you in preparing market analyses for you, and you can look at the photos of the homes to see what features may have (or have not) contributed to the sales price. You will feel much more comfortable when you make an offer if you are armed with all the right information.

Happy house hunting!

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