Posts Tagged ‘home buyers’

Home Buyers: Purchase Now or Wait Until Prices Drop?

Friday, March 10th, 2017

This seems to be the million dollar question right now as home buyers survey the lack of inventory and multiple offer situations present in many markets. A strong seller’s market and high prices make some buyers nervous. So is it better to buy now or wait?

There are a few very good reasons why now is the time to make that home purchase:

Interest rates are rising – We have already seen this happen and word is they will do so again this year, likely several times. This affects mortgage payments and down payments, so jumping in and securing that lower rate now could be smart. It is also important to note that some lenders are charging a lot more for interest rate lock extensions, so that is something to think about if you have a long escrow period or are pursuing a short sale.

Lack of inventory – Inventory in many markets is still very low – San Diego County included. Many buyers cannot find properties to purchase and when they do there are often multiple offers, especially in the $650,000 and under price range. Cash buyers are out in force as well in many lower range markets, making it even harder for first time home buyers. Being picky is getting more and more difficult – right now is a good time to be preapproved and ready to write an offer once you find a home that meets your criteria. See the home as soon as it comes on the market and submit your best offer right away.

Prices are not dropping as we head into the “busy season” – Lack of inventory is making it difficult as demand outpaces supply. Unless this changes we will not likely see price drops in the busy Spring and Summer months to come. The buyer who decides to wait this period out may find herself down the road with still low inventory and higher interest rates.

Here is an example: A house that currently sells for $766,000 with an interest rate of 4.75% and a 20% down payment would yield a payment of a little over $4000 a month. To get that same payment down the road with a home price drop to $727,000, assuming a higher 5.125% interest rate increase, the buyer would be losing $1585 over 3 years. So even if prices drop 5% and rates increase 3/8th  of a percent, the buyer who purchases with a lower rate now will be ahead in the long run.

Uncertainty – Worry about the future and economy is still prevalent among home buyers. Uncertainty about taxes and home write offs, as well as the expected rise in interest rates, make some buyers hesitate to make big purchases. The real estate market, like any market, is cyclical. If you are buying a home with a long term commitment then it is a great time to do so, before there are more rate hikes.

Before you decide whether it is best for you to purchase now or wait, it is important to discuss your scenario with you accountant or financial adviser, an experienced real estate agent in your area and your mortgage professional. Information is power.

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Still on the Fence? U.S. Home Prices are Still Rising

Tuesday, January 31st, 2017

The new housing report was released yesterday by Case-Shiller, indicating that U.S. home prices are still rising. Of course this is really area dependent, but if you are a potential buyer or seller you might feel worried, and justifiably so. Keep reading for important information and advice.

The report covers major metropolitan cities and states that prices in these areas rose by 5.27% in November – above expectations of economists, and also up from the previous month of 5.1%. What does this mean for buyers and sellers? Let’s take a look at some important considerations.

Local markets: Of course these studies are general and tend to focus on big cities, so it is important that you contact an experienced real estate agent in your local market to see what is going on in the area. But, the thing to take away from this data is that prices are not easing up. Combine that with the next factor…

Inventory is still very low: Again, your local market must be studied to get an accurate glimpse and set expectations (your real estate agent can help with this), but using my local North San Diego market as an example I know that this is painfully true. I have buyers who simply cannot find homes, and multiple offer situations in some categories – like properties under $600,000 – are still the norm. With low inventory and prices staying put or rising, a buyer does not benefit from waiting to purchase, especially considering the next factor…

Springtime is coming: Traditionally the “hot” season for housing, spring and summer are just around the corner. But in my view we are already in the heat of things. Hopefully more inventory will pop up as we head into that “busy” season, but honestly I think the entire last year and especially this Fall and Winter, can be considered busy in housing – at least here in San Diego. Waiting until Spring could put buyers in even more of a quandry, bringing an  increase in the buyer pool: more competition can drive prices up again.

The National Home Price Index also rose by 5.6% annually – up from 5.5% the previous month. High demand is causing these prices to continue on an upward trend. It is important to note, as some doubters or “bubble-talkers” as I call them, may believe, that these trends are NOT similar to those that occurred prior to the last housing crisis in the early 2000s.

How is this market different than that prior to the last crash?

1. Factors driving prices are not the same. Prior to the crash people were driven by speculation and anticipation of growth. Instead, healthy market factors like a strong job market and low mortgage rates are driving this market.

2. Lending is stricter. Lending requirements are not as loose as they were during the time prior to the last housing crash, so not everyone can qualify for a loan.

3. Demand is high but supply is not. Prior to the last market crash, there is a much lower supply of inventory in most areas. It is not so easy to find property to purchase. Many would-be sellers are afraid to sell, as they don’t know where they will move if there is such low supply and so much demand – so it’s a great time to be a seller if you have the time to wait it out on a subsequent purchase.

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The moral of all this information is that if you are a potential seller you are in a great position. But if you have to buy after selling you need to have a “plan B” in place – e.g. stay in a furnished month to month apartment or temporarily move in with a relative or friend will put these people in ideal situations to sell and wait for the right home. But buyers have it a bit tougher – the best advice I can give is to BE PREPARED. Get preapproved, start looking at everything in your price range and desired area – even those homes that may not be as upgraded as you like or in the exact neighborhood you wanted. Do your homework and be ready to pounce once you find that “right” home.

 

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FHA Annual Mortgage Insurance Premiums Reduced

Wednesday, January 11th, 2017

By Elvin J. Wesley, President and Broker of Ranch and Coast Mortgage Group

What a great way to start the week and 2017!!!

Monday morning HUD announced that it had achieved the balance of its statutory operational goals and as a result of that it requires a reduction of the Annual MIP charged. This exciting announcement from HUD yesterday morning that represents a 25 basis points improvement on most FHA Loans (not to interest rate, but to the Annual Mortgage Insurance Premium charged by HUD on FHA loans)

The Revised MIP schedule is effective for Endorsements of Mortgages with a Closing / Disbursement date on or after January 27, 2017. Closing / Disbursement date is defined as the later of the date of the signing of the Mortgage or the Disbursement of the Loan Proceeds as is entered in FHA Connection. Unlike changes in the past the change is effective based on the closing date and not the case number assignment date!
The Revisions applies to all FHA Title II Forward Programs excluding Mortgages insured under the National Housing Act section 247 (Hawaiian Homelands).

Here is a Summary of the changes

What does this mean in regards to $$…payment reduction when a buyer/borrower is purchasing a home?

Example:

Old – $550K base loan amount based on 0.85% MIP = $389.58 per month

NEW  – $550K base loan amount based on 0.60% MIP = $275.00 per month

That’s a $114.58 reduction in MIP payment, which means lower overall payment for buyers/borrowers and more BUYING power!

ALSO…..

On November 23rd the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) announced that the maximum conforming loan limits for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac in 2017 will increase, which of cources has now taken place. This will be the first increase in the baseline loan limit since 2006.  In higher-cost areas, higher loan limits will be in effect as shown below.

This change has already taken place for FHA and VA loans limits as well.

2017 Conforming and High Balance Loan Limits-

SAN DIEGO NEW LIMITS $424,100 Conforming and $612,500 High Balance

LOS ANGELES NEW LIMITS $424,100 Conforming and $636,150 High Balance

ORANGE COUNTY NEW LIMITS $424,100 Conforming and $636,150 High Balance

*See attached spreadsheet for more counties and limits for 2-4 unit properties

Conforming:

 

Number of Units Maximum base conforming loan limits for properties NOT in Alaska, Hawaii, Guam & U.S. Virgin Islands Maximum base conforming loan limits for properties in Alaska, Hawaii, Guam & U.S. Virgin Islands
  2017 2016 2017 2016
1 $424,100 $417,000 $636,150 $625,500
2 $543,000 $533,850 $814,500 $800,775
3 $656,350 $645,300 $984,525 $967,950
4 $815,650 $801,950 $1,223,475 $1,202,925

 

High Balance/Super Conforming:

 

Number of Units Minimum/Maximum Original Loan Amount Properties in Alaska, Hawaii, Guam & U.S. Virgin Islands
  Minimum Maximum Minimum Maximum
1 >$424,100 $636,150 >$636,150 $954,225
2 >$543,000 $814,500 >$814,500 $1,221,750
3 >$656350 $984,525 >$984,525 $1,476,775
4 >$815,650 $1,223,475 >$1,223,475 $1,835,200

 

Please refer to the full County Loan Limits list attached or just contact Elvin Wesley at Ranch and Coast Mortgage

(CA DRE license: 01316249, NMLS: 234795):

c 760.580.1733

760.230.2042

760.487.1295

f 866.683.5399 toll free

www.rcmloan.com

ewesley@rcmloan.com

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Trending San Diego Real Estate News

Monday, January 2nd, 2017

San Diego is definitely a desirable place to live, and as one of the most visited places in the United States it’s no wonder why – we have the best weather, beautiful  beaches, great food and nightlife, culture, incredible places to walk and hike, and so much more. There is nowhere else I’d rather live! sandiego

As we head into the new year here are some of the happening stories highlighting San Diego and the local real estate market.

San Diego Ranked 5th “Hottest” Real Estate Market in U.S. – Realtor.com ranked San Diego as the 5th “hottest” real estate market in the country. This is great news for the local market. The story pointed out that demand has especially grown since the election, likely due to increasing mortgage interest rates, and that the low supply levels heading into the new year will keep prices high – great news for sellers. Median sales time is 53 days in San Diego county, compared to 88 days nationwide.

San Diego Remains Top Destination for Foreign Buyers – We still rank as one of the top places for foreign buyers, especially those from China and Canada. San Diego is up there with Los Angeles, Orange County and San Francisco as the top places to purchase property in California. Speculation that this trend will continue in 2017 as many feel the US economy and the dollar will strengthen.

San Diego Home Sales Could be Protected by State Supreme Court Ruling – I have blogged about “dual agency” many times, and my position has always been that real estate agents should not be able to represent both the buyer and seller in a real estate transaction. The reason for this is that I feel it is virtually impossible to exercise a fiduciary duty to both parties – it can create too many conflicts of interest. The California Supreme Court seems to be coming closer to agreeing with this sentiment.

In November the court ruled that “a listing broker has a fiduciary responsibility to the buyer and the seller when his brokerage firm is representing both, setting a significant precedent for obtaining and sharing information in residential and commercial transactions.” While there are currently disclosures required which allow such situations, this ruling could be paving the way to no longer discontinuing them in the future…stay tuned for more.

If you need any information about property in the San Diego county area please feel free to contact me. Happy New Year!

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2017 San Diego Real Estate Market Predictions

Wednesday, December 21st, 2016

If you are like me you are surprised we are at the end of the year already, but the good news is that the real estate market fared well this year, and will likely continue to do so in 2017. Here are my annual predictions for the market, at least here in San Diego County: index

1.  Home inventory will remain low. Due to a combination of factors – rising interest rates, expenses of moving up and difficulty of finding replacement housing, many potential home sellers will likely choose to remain where they are and not sell. This trend defined the market in 2016 and I believe it will continue. Until Americans see how the new President will affect the market I am betting on this.

2.  Prices will stabilize for the most part. 2016 saw prices still rising slightly in some areas, and higher in others (especially in summer months), but for the most part things seem to be leveling off. I think we will return to “normal” annual price appreciations of 5-7%. Of course this is always area-dependent so check with your local realtor for market statistics and area comparables.

3.  Market times will decrease or remain low for desirable homes. Due to the continuation of lower inventory levels I believe we will see desirable homes sell quickly. But I also think that buyers are very savvy and will not pay crazy high prices either – although in a multiple offer situation you never know.

4.  First time buyers could have a difficult time with competition. As interest rates rise, inventory levels decrease (or remain low) and prices remain high, many first time home buyers may find themselves in challenging situations when looking for homes to purchase. Competition will also factor in, especially in areas where there is an influx of repeat homebuyers who are moving up and are well qualified (with large downpayments). My advice is for those first time buyers to get preapproved and start looking now. Click here to read more on how to “win” that home you want.

5.  Interest rates will rise. This is inevitable and we have already seen the beginning of the end of the lowest interest rates in history. The new administration will also play a role in the interest rate rise as economic goals fluctuate.

The bottom line is that I believe the housing market will do well in the coming year. I do not predict any “bubbles” as some (very few) have done. I think here in San Diego County our market is strong and will continue to be as we head into 2017.

As I always say, if you are thinking of buying or selling in the future you need to do your homework and start early – even a year is not too early. Study the markets, visit homes for sale, get to know inventory, neighborhoods and floorplans. Talk to a mortgage professional and plan ahead. Find a great local real estate agent and let him or her keep you informed so you are ready to go when the time is right. Be prepared and have a wonderful new year!

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Is the Real Estate Market Slowing Down?

Friday, October 7th, 2016

It has been an interesting time lately in the real estate market, and it is difficult to figure out exactly what is going on – is it slowing down, is it still hot…many people are confused. It really depends on your specific area, but there are some interesting things going on in my local markets…let’s take a look. dreamstime_988060

Multiple offers – still?! Yes! There are still some of those crazy multiple offer situations going on out there, and believe it or not they make it look like a seller’s market in the heat of summer. But this is not happening everywhere. It seems – at least in my neck of the woods in North San Diego – to be happening with condos and towhhomes that are very nicely upgraded, in good areas, and priced up to $550,000. Just last week I wrote an offer on a townhome for clients. The offer was super clean, priced over asking price, which was already stretching the appraisal potential, and a quick close in 30 days. We received a multiple counter offer asking us in essence to come up higher, remove the appraisal contingency at the outset, reduce all other contingency periods, and specifying that the sellers would make no repairs. We lost that one (I would never allow a buyer to remove an appraisal contingency unless they insisted, after being fully aware of the consequences).

Buyers are not jumping as high: Yes, this may sound like it contradicts the above paragraph, but it is true in most cases that buyers are not giving into inflated prices any longer. Most buyers (with the exception being the above scenario) are taking longer to find the right home, and then trying to negotiate the price. Much of the real estate news I read follows this position – after a crazy summer with prices inflating many buyers who missed the boat (or even those who intentionally waited out the crazy buyer storm) are finding that they can negotiate prices down and for that matter do not mind waiting until homes have some market time to make offers. This to me indicates the slow approach of a buyers market.

Fewer listings, fewer escrows opened: As is normal after the end of the summer season, listings are not as plentiful. But even after a fewer-than-usual-listings summer the Fall numbers continue to drop. Fewer escrows were opened in the last month compared to summer months. If this continues – fewer active properties, steady demand – it could spur the seller’s market to stick around for a bit…which means we could see prices rise. Interest rates will play a big part in this equation, as of course will jobs – people have to be able to afford homes.

In a nutshell the market is a bit hard to predict right now and doing so requires focusing on the specific community in which you are searching. For those buyers out there who are ready, willing and able to purchase my advice is to not rush into anything (unless you find your absolute “must-have it” dream home – but even then you need to be careful), consult with an experienced real estate agent to make a plan,  stick to your budget and stick to your guns when negotiating price, repairs and other items.

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Growing Housing Inventory Will Affect Buyers and Sellers

Tuesday, June 28th, 2016

Attention home buyers and sellers: home inventory is growing. Over the last few years we have seen decreased inventory in many areas, including here in San Diego County. This has made it tricky for many buyers as supply has not met demand, but has been positive for sellers as the seller market picked up speed. But inventory appears to be growing and there are many extenuating circumstances that make now a good time to sell or buy real estate. 0

Home ownership holding period – Over time most homeowners have tended to occupy their homes on the average for about 6-7 years before selling. But over the last few years this number increased and many sellers were staying in their homes 9-10 years due to economic factors. However, there  has been a trend downward lately due to equity increases and market conditions.

Equity – The last few years have brought equity gains to many homeowners, and low interest rates make it a great time to buy – this combination is positive news for housing. But like any market there will be a correction in time, where equity stops rising as quickly. Here in San Diego County we are starting to see slight slow downs with sales – sales prices are dropping slightly and many homes are sitting on the market longer.

Seller Market – It has been a seller’s market for some time now, due to lack of inventory in many housing markets, combined with a healthy  demand. but with external changes on the rise more sellers will likely consider selling due to strong market conditions and other economic factors that may make them question how long the equity rise will continue. As inventory increases it may turn into a buyer market so long as demand is still prevalent and supply increases.

Economy –  There are several economic factors that may influence a seller or buyer, and moving forward these will likely play a role in decisions to buy or sell. For buyers, low interest rates and international economic conditions that affect our US economy could play into the decision- making process. As markets are cyclical most buyers and sellers know that low rates will not last forever. The looming Presidential election could also factor into housing, as well as international situations like Brexit and terrorism.

The bottom line is that no one has a crystal ball. Many predictions abound and feeding into them can make a buyer or seller crazy. Each individual has to consider their own factors – equity, supply, prices, external and personal economic factors. Talk to your accountant and an experienced real estate professional – but don’t wait too long because the market will change at some point.

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6 Types of Monkey Business Going on in Real Estate Now

Monday, May 23rd, 2016

If you are a real estate agent or a home buyer you may notice that the market is obviously low on inventory right now. Being that it is the “selling season” of Spring/Summer, and since there are a lot of buyers out there looking at homes, there are many situations involving multiple counter offers and homes selling for well over asking price…all great if you are a seller. However, there are also some fishy things going on out there and it is frustrating to agents and their buyers. th

Let’s take a look at what is happening:

1. Homes listed well over comparable value. Many, and I mean a LOT, of homes in North San Diego are being listed over market value – some slightly and some way over. Buyers, who normally would avoid such homes until the price drops, are flocking to them and making offers anyway. No one seems concerned that the home likely will not appraise, and if one buyer walks there are many more who will step right in. This is pricing out first time homeowners and bringing prices up…you may think the latter is good, but it is dangerous because such inflation could create problems for the market – especially when there are many buyers who have incomes that will price them out of neighborhoods they should have been able to afford had prices reflected comparable sold values.

2. Many sellers are taking a long time to respond to offers – even very strong ones. If a buyer makes a very strong offer over asking price, many listing agents are waiting for 4 or 5 days to even respond, during which time they collect more offers. Many then submit multiple counter offers to all bidders asking for the best and highest price. This prices many potential buyers out of the running, and most already submitted an offer slightly over their budget.

3. Sellers are refusing to make repairs or pay for reports. In a seller’s market the seller knows s/he is in the driver’s seat, and many sellers are countering back stating the home is sold as is, and that they will make no repairs and pay for no reports – like termite reports. They want the cleanest offers possible with the least amount of money out of pocket. This means the buyer can get stuck with multiple repairs, termite work, etc. If the buyer is already paying top dollar for the home, s/he has to make sure those things are affordable. No one wants to see a new foreclosure wave hit in a few years.

4. Appraisals are not coming in at contract value – but that is not deterring sales. I have not had problems with appraisals on listings (I don’t market properties in the “insane” price category), but have heard from many agents who have. Even if the home does not appraise at contract value, there are plenty of buyers who are willing to pay the difference in cash if sellers will not negotiate prices down to the appraised value. They feel that is the only way to secure a home purchase in these crazy times. Does this sound like 2003/2004 – “pre-crash” – to anyone else besides me?

5. Overly aggressive listing agents seem to be multiplying, and they are not being cooperative. There are many listing agents who are ruthless and even rude. They don’t care that your buyers love the home and have been looking in that neighborhood for a long time, or that they wrote a very strong offer and submitted it first. To these agents, it’s all about playing the game and finding the highest bidder. Some agents do not return calls and emails, and some violate the Realtor code of ethics – a few may even commit fraud. It is extremely frustrating for buyer’s agents, who are trying to find a home for their well-qualified buyers.

6. Pocket listings and homes listed “off the MLS” are increasing. Many agents are marketing their listings on third party sites like Zillow, and not placing them on the MLS – the cooperative tool used by Realtors to benefit all parties looking in particular areas/price ranges. While it is their right to do so, it makes a problem for buyer’s agents whose clients may see these listings and want to visit them – but when their agent calls the listing agent to make an appointment she is often told that the seller is not paying a commission to buyers’ agents. Imagine you have been helping your buyers for months to find a home and now you cannot show them this one home because the broker will not cooperate with your broker. It puts buyer’s agents – who play an imperative role in protecting buyer’s rights – in a very sticky situation. You may ask why listing agents do this: the answer is so they can find buyers who will work with them, thus saving the seller from paying out a commission to the buyer’s agent. Hopefully the California Supreme Court will soon put an end to double ending sales and this will no longer be a problem.

I am a bit concerned and hope that we are not heading into trouble in the real estate market. I hope that agents keep in mind the spirit of cooperation that is inherent in our business – we all need to work together and be fair. If we do not then buyers and sellers will not be protected from future lawsuits, and many people will be priced out of the housing market – which could cause a domino effect with local economies and eventually the US economy.

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CA Supreme Court to Review Legality of Dual Agency

Tuesday, May 10th, 2016

The California Supreme Court will soon have a chance to review the practice of dual agency, where a broker (either through one agent or two agents who work for the same broker) represents both the buyer and seller in the sale of real property. California is a state that allows this practice, although the California Association of Realtors has penned rules that require full disclosure of such situations to all parties. Nevertheless, when one agent/broker represents both sides of a sale transaction there is a big conflict of interest, and the possibility of misrepresentation and breach of agency duties is highly possible. I have always been against dual agency, but I have represented both buyer and seller in transactions – there are rare situations where the scenario can work effectively. I think it would be better for all sellers and buyers if it were not allowed. images

Here is an example of a typical dual agency dilemma for an agent: If a seller tells his agent something in confidence, say what is his bottom line for an acceptable sales price, and that agent then represents the buyer – who asks what price they should offer on the home – the agent is placed in a very precarious situation. The agent in this example owes a duty to both sides, but how can she answer  her buyer’s question without betraying the seller’s confidence? She knows what the seller will take, but it is her duty to get the seller the best offer possible. Similarly, it is her duty to do her best on behalf of her buyer now, so it puts her in a hard place.

The case at hand stems from a sale of a luxury home in Malibu, in which the buyer (represented by a Coldwell Banker agent) claimed the listing agent (a different Coldwell Banker agent) failed to disclose to him that his home was much smaller in square footage than advertised – this claiming that the price was inflated for the size of the home.

I believe that dual agency should never be allowed unless the broker is also an attorney, and even then I have doubts. After all, it is not allowed with attorneys – could you imagine hiring counsel for the opposing side in a court battle! This is a very sensitive area and many agents do not understand the legalities involved. It will be interesting to see what the court decides.

 

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Report: San Diego March Home Prices Were Highest in 9 Years

Tuesday, April 19th, 2016

A study just released by CoreLogic states that homes sold in San Diego this March had the highest prices in 9 years, with a median home price of $478,000. How is this possible with such low inventory, you may ask? Well, it is likely because of that low inventory that prices have skyrocketed. When levels are low affordability tends to increase as homes sell for higher prices, making it a seller’s market. statistics

Another factor contributing to the current market status is that interest rates have remained exceptionally low, creating a surplus of buyers (some rates are reportedly under 4% for 30 year fixed loans). Spring  and Summer – the traditional “big” selling seasons – are in full swing with qualified buyers abound who have few choices. We are seeing multiple offer situations all over the place (I just wrote an offer the other day and there were 6 offers, all at or over asking price). Buyers are ready to buy and when a home in a desirable area is listed it likely will sell quickly – a strong reason to make sure you are preapproved if you are planning to purchase a home soon.

According to the report, home sales increased 5.1% year over year, with new home sales leaping 28.1% last month. All of this makes it a great time to sell, but many sellers do not do so because they are afraid they won’t find replacement property, putting many in a Catch-22 situation. On the other hand, home improvement stores have been doing very well since the start of the year, as many homeowners may be deciding to make improvements rather than chance selling with no where to move – we seem to be stuck in a rut of sorts.

Here in North San Diego I have seen a lot more off-market homes being marketed to real estate agents. In other words, agents list properties and market them without putting them on the MLS (a VERY good reason why all buyers need to have agents!). Many of these homes do not make it to the MLS until they are in escrow, giving buyers no opportunity to view them or make offers. This is frustrating but the early bird gets the worm I suppose. I have received emails and recorded phone calls about property that are not on the market yet but are being marketed to brokers or agents.

The bottom line is that prices have definitely risen and inventory is tight, but if you do your homework and prepare before buying or selling, you should be able to do well. If you are merely selling and have an appealing home in a desirable neighborhood you will be in the driver’s seat. If you are buying make sure to get preapproved, work with a real estate agent, get educated on the market in which you focus your search, and be ready to write the strongest offer you can.

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