Archive for January, 2018

Home Seller Dilemma: Sell Now or Wait Until Spring?

Monday, January 29th, 2018

A lot of homeowners have been wondering whether to sell now or wait until Spring. While Spring and early summer are typically the best times to sell, when a large majority of buyers are searching for homes, this year there is no reason to wait if you are a seller…and here is why:

Low Inventory – although picking up in some places, housing inventory is still low. The last year has been challenging for those who are ready, willing and able to buy, since they are unable to find homes that meet their needs or desires. This puts sellers in a great position while it is still a seller’s market.

Mortgage rates will continue to rise – rates have risen once already and will likely do so twice more this year. Combined with low inventory this double whammy will effect homebuyers, effecting their purchasing power and pricing some out of certain markets. If inventory picks up and the rates rise it will start to shift to a buyer’s market, and prices could come down in the long run.

Here is an example I read on a lender’s blog: If rates increase by 1%, from 4% to 5%, a buyer will lose 10% in purchasing power. This means that if a buyer can afford to purchase a $600k home today, but rates increase by 1%, she will only afford $540k using the same monthly payment.

Borrowing is still cheap – from a historical perspective it is still inexpensive to borrow money.

Prices will likely continue to rise – most economists and those who watch the real estate market predict that despite rate increases, prices will continue to rise in 2018. In the last year prices in San Diego County increased 9.1% – this was higher than the yearly increase of 4.2% in 2016. Again, this could impact homebuyers in many areas of the county.

New tax laws will likely effect high-end borrowers – those who are obtaining loans for high end properties will be effected from a tax perspective, as the new laws cap the mortgage interest deduction and the ability to deduct state and local taxes. Therefore the higher end market will be impacted this year, but we will have to wait and see the extent.

Based on the above it is an ideal time to sell. There is a great demand out there – I get emails from agents every week asking about whether I have any upcoming listings in certain neighborhoods. Many homes are selling before they even hit the MLS, and many agents are choosing to put their listings on sites other than the MLS first, in order to try to represent both parties in the sale (so some buyers may not even be aware of listings in neighborhoods they like).

Share
RSS Feed

The HOA Dilemma for Home Buyers: What You Need To Know

Thursday, January 18th, 2018

Many home buyers considering attached home purchases – condos, townhomes or twin homes – often discover that HOA payments could alter monthly payments quite a bit more than anticipated, and may mean the difference between whether a purchase makes sense and if a loan will be approved.

HOA communities can often come with high monthly payments, especially in areas that are desirable such as those close to the beach, town centers, etc. Here are the things buyers should look into when deciding whether to buy a property with a high HOA:

1. What do the fees cover? Most cover exterior building maintenance and insurance, as well as the common areas (landscaping, pool and spa if they exist, gates and parking facilities). Home owners are responsible for insurance that covers the interior of the home, including all personal items. Make sure you understand exactly what is covered in the fee so you are not surprised.

2. CC&Rs. Usually a buyer cannot get copies of these until a contract has been negotiated and escrow opened. Once the documents are received make sure to read them thoroughly to understand owner responsibility and coverage. If you are thinking about making an offer and have specific questions, your agent can try to get the answers from the HOA or the listing agent/sellers. But if numbers work out for your loan and you love the home, make an offer and then you can get your hands on all the documents. You have a contingency period in which to review them so if you discover anything that concerns you, you have time to cancel the contract.

3. Assessments. The seller will be able to tell you if there are any upcoming assessments, but you will also be able to get an idea of what may pop up in the near future from the age and location of the complex. Make sure to take this into consideration – for example, if the complex is 25 years old you may surmise that in the next 5-10 years the roof will need to be replaced. Usually the HOA will assess homeowners to cover such a large expense. Payments will usually go up for a period of time until the money is collected. Some associations give a choice so the owner can break down the payments over time or pay a lump sum.

4. Dues increase. Note that HOA dues are subject to increase on an annual basis, or whenever the board feels it is needed in order to cover increased expenses. As a potential homeowner in the complex it is important to keep this in mind, especially if the price of the dues is already stretching your budget. Make sure to talk this over with your real estate and mortgage professionals.

5. HOA strength. One of the most important things to find out is just how strong the HOA reserves are – this will obviously carry it far if an unexpected expense does arise. If the reserves are low they would have to raise the dues a lot in order to cover unanticipated expenses. One great way to make sure the board is doing thing correctly is to get on the board! I have a friend with an accountant background who got on her board when she moved into the community – she found it many ways to save money and helped bring it back to a healthier place, reserve-wise.

6. Lawsuits. Check to see if there are any lawsuits against the HOA, as this could effect your purchase. Discuss with your mortgage professional.

No matter what type of home you purchase the bottom line is that you will have to be comfortable with expenses, including any that may not be forseeable. It is important to scrutinize HOA documentation so you are familiar with where the money is spent.

Share
RSS Feed